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Other People's Children: What happens to those in the bottom 50% academically?

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Other People's Children: What happens to those in the bottom 50% academically?

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In 2017 Barnaby Lenon, previously the head master of Harrow School, wrote a best-selling book about high-achieving state schools in England (Much Promise). Later that year he went on a tour of Further Education colleges and started to research the fortunes of those who do less well at school. In Other People's Children he writes about the state of vocational education in England and the implications of his findings for a post-Brexit economy.

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In 2017 Barnaby Lenon, previously the head master of Harrow School, wrote a best-selling book about high-achieving state schools in England (Much Promise). Later that year he went on a tour of Further Education colleges and started to research the fortunes of those who do less well at school. In Other People's Children he writes about the state of vocational education in England and the implications of his findings for a post-Brexit economy.

About the author

Barnaby Lenon was educated at a Direct Grant school and Oxford University, taught at Eton, Sherborne School, Holland Park comprehensive and Highgate School, and was head of Trinity School Croydon and Harrow School. He has been a governor of many schools, state and independent, and is chairman of governors of a free school, the London Academy of Excellence. He is on the boards of Ofqual, the New Schools Network, the Yellow Submarine charity for young people with learning disabilities, and chairs the Independent Schools Council.

Reviews
'Other People’s Children make a grand sweep over the history of education, providing a fascinating description of year of policy failure to address a fundamental challenge which we have faced in this country for at least the last century, but probably for longer. The coverage and the depth of analysis is impressive and should make this book a must-read for any policy wonks in the field; it will certainly provide food for thought for any committed reader. As I read the book, I hoped in vain for a beautifully-crafted final chapter with the simple silver bullet solutions; but of course I was to be disappointed. That’s no surprise, because the challenge the book addresses is so longstanding and so tied up in the culture, class system and politics of our nation. There is no easy solution. The data presented shows just how entrenched and stubborn our class system, our geographical inequalities and our values are in educational and life outcomes.' David Hughes, Chief Executive, Association of Colleges

'For too long, our FE provision has felt like the Cinderella offer within our wider education system. In this strongly argued analysis, Barnaby Lenon has built on his best-selling book about high-performing state schools, Much Promise, with this heartfelt call to action to improve the status and quality of what is on offer for almost half of all pupils as they enter post-16 education. As a society, he argues, we need to value ‘head, hand and heart’, not just cognitive ability. In his characteristically thorough way, Barnaby Lenon summarises the key evidence in this important debate, starting with the early years, highlighting how educational disadvantage leads to a growing achievement gap and an unacceptably long tail of underachievement. His analysis forms the basis of an insightful critique of current reforms that leads to a series of powerful recommendations about how this important area of our educational system can be given the status and success it deserves.' Andy Buck, CEO, Leadership Matters

Additional Information

Author Barnaby Lenon
ISBN 9781911382539
No of pages 322
Format Paperback
Publication Date 20 Feb 2018

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